Tag Archives: grits

Pimiento Cheese Baked Grits

Grits are a staple of Southern fare and can be enjoyed with any meal from breakfast to supper! Paring it with another Southern staple, pimento cheese just takes it to another level. We know you will certainly enjoy it!

Pimiento Cheese Baked Grits

This is a great make-ahead dish. Prepare through step 2; cover and chill overnight. Let grits stand at room temperature while preheating your oven.

Yield/ Number of Servings: 6-8

Hands on time: 35 min

Total time: 1 hour 35 min

Ingredients:

1 tsp. salt

1 cup Old Mill Yellow Grits

1 cup half and half

¼ tsp. cayenne

3 cups (12 oz) shredded sharp cheddar cheese

1 (4 oz) jar diced pimientos, drained

1/3 cup chopped green onion

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

 

  1. Bring 4 cups of water and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Slowly whisk in grits. Reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring often, 30 minutes or until grits are thickened and tender. Remove from heat.
  2. Add half and half, cayenne, cheese, pimientos, and green onion to grits, stirring until cheese melts. Stir in eggs. Pour grits into a lightly greased 2-quart baking dish.
  3. Preheat oven to 350F. Bake 50-55 minutes or until golden brown and edges are set. Let cool 10 minutes before serving. Sprinkle with additional chopped green onion, if desired.

Ever Wonder What a Grit is?

Here at The Old Mill, our products are milled the old-fashioned way. We grind corn into cornmeal or grits using French Buhr Flint Granite stones, just like this mill has done since 1830. The power comes from the sheer force of the Little Pigeon River being diverted by the dam so the water moves through a turbine, which turns the shafts, wheels, and belt connected to the stones. We then have what is called a “grits machine,” which sifts the grits, removing the hull so you get the heart of the kernel of corn. It is electric-powered today, but originally it was fueled by the power of our big water wheel turning. The iconic water wheel still operates grain elevators, which carry the corn to the stones. We think it’s important to stay true to the way corn has always been ground to feed the residents of the Smoky Mountains. Stone-grinding produces meal and grits with more flavor. In our grits, you can taste the corn! And their stone-ground texture works in all kinds of great recipes, from shrimp and grits to a simple bowl of grits with butter for breakfast.
Grits have been milled in the South ever since the native Americans introduced the settlers to the process. They are the backbone of many great mountain recipes, but you need to see for yourself. Come visit us and have our freshly milled yellow grits for breakfast and take home a bag of the yellow or white grits. If you can’t visit the Smokies, you can always order our grits online. September 2nd is National Grits for Breakfast Day, so plan now and you can celebrate with us!

Smoky Grits Cakes & Collards

IMG_2065 2Grits cakes are crisp-fried with smoky, creamy flavor and stone-ground texture.  Top them with fresh collards that are cooked with smoked bacon, our own sourwood honey, and apple cider vinegar.  Serve for an all-vegetable dinner, or with ham.  

Makes 4 servings

For grits:

1 1/3 cups water

1 cup half-and-half, heavy cream, or milk

1 cup OLD MILL STONE GROUND GRITS

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup (4 ounces) shredded smoked Gouda cheese

2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

For collards:

2 bunches collard greens, rinsed, stems and ribs removed

1 medium onion, diced

4 slices smoked bacon, sliced crosswise

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 cup apple cider vinegar

1/3 cup OLD MILL SOURWOOD HONEY

1/2 teaspoon salt

Hot sauce and freshly ground pepper, to taste

  • Prepare grits: Bring water and half-and-half to a boil in a medium saucepan;  gradually whisk in grits and salt.  Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook until thick and tender, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in cheese, butter, and pepper,
  • Line a 9-inch square baking pan with a strip of parchment paper, extending up 2 sides of pan. Pour grits into pan.  Cover and refrigerate until chilled, 2 hours or up to overnight.
  • Prepare collards:  Stack leaves and slice.  Cook onion and bacon in a large heavy saucepan over medium-high heat until mixture is browned evenly but not caramelized, 8 to 10 minutes.  Add garlic and cook until golden, 30 to 60 seconds.  Add collards;  stir and cook to slightly wilt.  Add vinegar, honey, and salt; bring to a boil, stirring to scrape up browned bits.  Reduce heat to medium and cook, uncovered, until the collards are just tender, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and season with hot sauce and additional salt, if desired. Keep warm.
  • To fry grits, heat 2 inches oil in a large, heavy skillet to 350°.   Cut grits into squares or circles with a biscuit cutter;  dust with flour, and fry until golden brown, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes on each side.
  • Arrange fried grits on servings plates;  spoon collards on top.