Category Archives: Bakery

Old-Fashioned Cornbread

Old-Fashioned Cornbread

 
Makes 8 servings
Prep: 5 minutes
Bake: 25 to 30 minutes
Ingredients:
1 large egg
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup vegetable oil, plus 2 tablespoons for the skillet
Directions:
  1. Place a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Place the cornmeal in a large bowl, and stir in the egg, buttermilk, and 1/4 cup oil until just combined.
  3. Pour 2 tablespoons of the oil in a 10-inch cast iron skillet and place over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, pour the batter into the skillet, and place the pan in the oven. Bake until the top is firm to the touch and the sides are well browned, 25 to 30 minutes. Turn out onto a board and slice into wedges. Serve warm.
For a 12-inch skillet – bake 20 to 25 minutes
Note:
For True Southern Cornbread (without an egg), use 2 cups The Old Mill Self-Rising White Cornmeal, 1 3/4 cups buttermilk, and 1/4 cup vegetable oil. Bake at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes.

Jalapeno Cornbread Squares with Festive Toppings

Cornbread has been the backbone of the Smoky Mountain foodways for a long time. It was the bread that extended the everyday meal, making simple provisions more filling and interesting. But cornbread can be transported to the modern-day kitchen, too, where it is the perfect foil for festive holiday toppings of black eyed pea relish, pimento cheese, and sweet-hot pepper jelly. These country-style canapés are vegetarian-friendly and an easy do-ahead appetizer for busy holiday entertaining. They are the perfect accompaniment to ham, smoked turkey, even bowls of chili.

Jalapeno Cornbread Squares with Festive Toppings

Makes about 12 servings (about 54 squares)
Prep time: 20 to 25 minutes
Bake time: 15 to 20 minutes
Ingredients:
Cornbread:
2 large eggs
1 cup cream-style corn (frozen or canned)
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup chopped green onions
1 cup shredded Cheddar or a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend
Optional: 1 teaspoon diced jalapeno pepper and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Toppings:
1 cup prepared pimento cheese
1/4 cup pepper jelly, if desired
Thinly sliced ham and fresh figs
Directions:
1. Place a rack in the center of the oven, and preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Mist a 13- by 9-inch metal baking pan with vegetable oil spray, and set the pan aside.
2. Place the cornbread mix, eggs, cream-style corn, buttermilk, and oil in a large mixing bowl and stir with a wooden spoon or spatula to just combine, 1 minute. Do not over-mix. Fold in the green onions and cheese, and the jalapeno pepper and black pepper if you like it spicier. Turn the batter into the prepared pan.
3. Place the pan in the oven, and bake until the cornbread is golden brown and springs back in the center when lightly pressed, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, and let the cornbread cool completely in the pan, 1 hour.
4. When ready to assemble, cut the cornbread into about 54 squares. Remove the squares to a large tray or sheet pan. Top some of the squares with a teaspoon of black eyed pea relish and the others with a teaspoon of pimento cheese. Top the pimento cheese-covered squares with a dab of pepper jelly, if desired, or candied pepper slices. Top the rest with thinly sliced ham or prosciutto rolled up into a little rose alongside a thin slice of fig. Arrange on a platter and serve at room temperature.

One-Bowl Pumpkin Squares with Cream Cheese Icing

Every fall kitchen needs a good pumpkin square recipe, and this cake does not disappoint. Pumpkins were originally cultivated by Native Americans and are a great source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. Bake these squares in a 13-by 9-inch pan, and freeze them unfrosted if you like to bake ahead. And if you like less icing and more of a glaze, cut the icing recipe in half and spread it over the warm cake.
Makes about 24 to 32 squares
Prep: 15 minutes
Bake: 25 to 30 minutes      Note: If baking in a Pigeon River Pottery dish, add approx. 10 minutes to baking time.
Ingredients for the Cake:
Vegetable oil spray for misting the pan
1 can (15 ounces) pumpkin
4 large eggs
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup lightly packed light brown sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
Ingredients for the Cream Cheese Icing:
4 ounces (half an 8-inch block) cream cheese, at room temperature
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Directions:
1. Place a rack in the center of the oven, and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mist a 13- by 9-inch pan with vegetable oil spray, and set the pan aside.
2. Place the pumpkin, eggs, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and oil in a large mixing bowl, and mix with a wooden spoon until the eggs are incorporated and the mixture has thickened slightly and is smooth, about 100 strokes. Place the flour, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda and salt on top of the pumpkin mixture, and with a fork, toss the dry ingredients together to combine lightly. Using the wooden spoon, fold the dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture and stir until smooth, about 50 strokes.
3. Turn the batter into the prepared pan, and place the pan in the oven. Bake until the cake springs back when lightly pressed and has turned lightly browned around the edges, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven to cool.
4. Meanwhile, prepare the icing. Place the soft cream cheese and butter in a medium-size mixing bowl. Blend with a hand-mixer on low speed, or with a wooden spoon, until smooth. Add the sugar and vanilla, and blend until smooth, 1 minute.
5. When the pumpkin cake has cooled to the touch, spread the icing over the top of the cake, and let the cake rest for 1 hour before slicing into squares or bars.

Apple Stack Cake

Photo credit: American Cake, by Anne Byrn (Rodale, 2016)

If you were invited to a wedding in the Appalachian mountains, you might be asked to bring a cake layer. For generations, a wedding cake has been constructed from these spice cake layers and filled with a thick and fragrant apple butter made from dried apples put up from the fall harvest. The more layers to the cake – 12 to 16, perhaps – the more popular the bride, or so the story goes. Stack cakes may contain other fillings, often lemon or coconut, but the original was and still is apple. Not calling for fancy and expensive ingredients, stack cakes use what people have on hand – modest baking staples like sorghum, flour, and vegetable shortening, and you could bake the cake in a cast iron skillet. Or you can use 9-inch round cake pans. The secret to a great stack cake is to bake it a day in advance and cover it so that the apple filling slowly seeps into the cake. To save time, use apple butter, such as the Old Mill Apple Butter, instead of making the filling.

Here are links to Old Mill Products, which can be used in the recipe below from our friend Anne Byrn. Old Mill Apple Butter, Spiced Apple Seasoning, Old Mill Plain Flour, Muddy Pond Sorghum, Molasses

Makes: 12 to 16 servings
Prep: 2 hours
Bake: 14 to 16 minutes
Apple Filling:
15 to 16 ounces dried unsulphured apple rings (4 to 5 packed cups)
1 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 cups water
Cake:
5 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup sorghum or molasses
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup low-fat buttermilk, at room temperature
Garnish:
Powdered sugar or sweetened whipped cream
Directions:
1. For the filling, place the apples in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg over the apples. Pour in the water, which should half-cover the apples. Bring the mixture to a boil, and once boiling, reduce the heat to low and allow to simmer, covered, for about 1 hour, or until the apples are soft and the mixture has thickened. Add a bit more water if needed. Remove the apples from the heat and let them cool. When cool, place them in thirds in a food processor and pulse until smooth but some chunks of apple remain. Or mash the apples by hand with a potato masher. You will have about 5 heaping cups of apples to spread between 6 cake layers. Set aside.
2. Meanwhile, for the cake, place a rack in the center of the oven, and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Cut six pieces of parchment paper to fit in the bottom of six 9-inch round pans. Smear a bit of vegetable shortening on the bottom of the pans to hold the parchment in place, and set the pans aside.
3. Place the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk to combine, and set the mixture aside. In another large bowl, place the shortening, sugar, and sorghum. Beat with an electric mixer on medium speed until the mixture is creamy and smooth, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating just until blended. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the flour mixture alternately with the buttermilk, beginning and ending with the flour, and beating until smooth, 1 to 2 minutes. The batter will be thick, more like a cookie dough. Use a strong rubber spatula, if needed, to facilitate mixing.
4. Divide the batter into 6 equal parts. Each part will be about 10 ounces. Spread the batter out into the pans, using the rubber spatula or a flexible metal spatula. Place 2 to 3 pans in the oven at a time, depending on the size of your oven. Bake until the cakes are a light golden color and spring back when lightly pressed in the center, 14 to 16 minutes. Remove the pans to a wire rack to cool 3 minutes, then run a knife around the edges and turn out the warm layers onto the rack. Immediately spread 1 heaping cup of apple filling over the top of the warm layer. Top with a second layer, spread on filling, top with a third, and so on. Repeat the process for the rest of the batter until you end with the 6th layer on top.
5. Place the cake in a cake saver or under a cake dome for 1 to 2 days before serving. Before serving, sprinkle the top of the cake with powdered sugar or pile on whipped cream.
– Used with permission from Anne Byrn author of American Cake. This recipe appears in American Cake (Rodale Books, 2016).