Category Archives: Bakery

Everything is Coming up Cherries at The Old Mill in February

George Washington’s birthday, the cherry tree, and National Cherry Month are good excuses to bake up an Old-Fashioned Cherry Crumble from The Old Mill. What’s a crumble? Sort of a crisp, except with bigger, crunchier, more crumbly pieces of oat and brown sugar topping. And underneath? Cherries and sugar cooked down to sweet, delicious goodness.

While fresh cherries aren’t in season in February, you can buy them canned or frozen to create this easy dessert. To kick up the fresh cherry flavor, add a quarter cup of dried cherries. It’s a winter pie-baking trick borrowed from the pages of early frontier cooking. Smoky Mountain cooks dried local apples slices and then used the fruit in baking throughout the year. Dried fruit, whether cherries, apples, or peaches, has a powerful flavor, and dried cherries add intensity to this recipe.

It’s the easiest pie on earth – no crust – just a crumbly, crunchy, heavenly mixture of brown sugar, butter, oats and cinnamon on top of the sweet-yet-tart cherries underneath. Serve warm in bowls with vanilla ice cream.

The Old Mill is so crazy about cherries, we are sampling Chocolate Moonshine Cherries the whole month of February at our Distillery. They’re a perfect Valentine’s Day gift! In the Farmhouse, Liz has been baking up fresh Cherry Handpies and we are sampling out a variety of cherry dips,  cherry cobbler in a jar, and even cherry Sweet Fire Pickles. In the Old Mill Restaurant, we’re offering our Chocolate Cherry Moonshine Preserves at breakfast, and at the Candy Kitchen, we’re making a white chocolate bark with, what else? Cherries!

Here is our recipe. And, we cannot tell a lie, this is so good!

Old-Fashioned Cherry Crumble

Makes 8 servings

Prep time: 20 minutes

Bake time: 38 to 42 minutes

Ingredients needed for pie:

4 cups pitted sour cherries (see Notes)

1/4 cup dried cherries, if desired (see Notes)

4 to 5 tablespoons granulated sugar

 

Crumble Topping:

3/4 cup The Old Mill Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

2 tablespoons The Old Mill Whole Wheat Flour

1/2 cup light brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

8 tablespoons (1 stick) cold unsalted butter

1/2 cup The Old Mill Thick Table Rolled Oats

1/4 cup chopped pecans

Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Directions:

  1. Place a rack in the center of the oven, and preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Set aside a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan. If you are using our Farmhouse Collection Pie Plate or Pottery Pie Plate, like we do, do not preheat your oven and add about 5 minutes to the baking time.
  2. Drain the cherries and place in a large bowl with dried cherries and sugar. Toss to combine, and set aside.
  3. For the topping, place the flours, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a large bowl and stir to combine. Or, place in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse to combine. Cut the butter into 1/2-inch size pieces and distribute over the top of the bowl. Cut the butter into the flour mixture with two knives or a pastry blender until the mixture resembles a coarse meal. (Or, if using a food processor, pulse until combined.) Stir in the oats and pecans. Work the mixture with your hands until it comes together into loose pieces. Set aside.
  4. Turn the cherries and any juice that might have seeped from them into the reserved pan. Cover the cherries with the topping, using your hands as needed to distribute it over the top. Place the pan in the oven.
  5. Bake until the crumble is golden brown and the filling is bubbling around the edges, 38 to 42 minutes. Remove to a rack to cool 20 minutes before serving warm in bowls with ice cream.

Notes: If fresh sour cherries are available, by all means, use them in this recipe. If you are baking this out of season, however, you can use canned or frozen, thawed cherries. Drain cherries well. The dried cherries add flavor, and they soften as the crumble bakes.

Cornmeal Snickerdoodles

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2 cups (4 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

3 cups sugar, divided

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

2 large eggs

2 large egg yolks

2 tablespoons vanilla extract

3 1/2 cups Old Mill Plain Flour

2 cups Old Mill Plain Unbolted Cornmeal

2 teaspoons baking soda

2 teaspoons cream of tartar

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, divided

 

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.

Place butter, 1 1/2 cups sugar, and brown sugar in a large mixing bowl;  beat at medium speed until creamy.  Add eggs and egg yolks, one at a time, beating at low speed just until blended. Beat in vanilla.

Combine Old Mill Plain Flour, Old Mill Plain Unbolted Cornmeal, baking soda, cream of tartar, salt, and 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon in a large bowl;  whisk to blend.  Add to butter mixture and beat until blended.

Combine remaining 1 1/2 cups sugar and 1 tablespoon cinnamon in a shallow dish. Scoop cookie dough, by 1/4 cup, and roll into balls.  Roll in cinnamon sugar mixture and place on baking sheets, spacing 2 inches apart.  Place in freezer until ready to bake.

Bake until golden, 10 to 15 minutes.  Let cool completely on baking sheets on wire racks.

 

Makes 34 cookies

 

Old Mill Biscuits

2 cups OLD MILL BISCUIT MIX

1/2 cup water

Preheat oven to 450°F. Combine Old Mill Biscuit Mix and water in a large bowl;  mix with a wooden spoon until dough comes together.  Turn out onto a floured surface;  fold in edges to center.  Pat out or roll out to 1-inch thickness;  cut out with biscuit cutter.  Reroll scraps and cut out remaining biscuits.  Place on uncreased baking sheet and bake until lightly browned, 10 to 12 minutes.

Self-Rising Buttermilk Biscuits

 

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2 1/4 cups OLD MILL SELF-RISING FLOUR

1 stick (1/2 cup) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

1 1/4 cups full-fat buttermilk

2 tablespoons butter, melted

Preheat oven to 450°F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Place Old Mill Self-Rising Flour in a large bowl.  Sprinkle butter pieces over flour; using your fingertips, snap butter and shortening into dry ingredients pieces are no larger than small peas and mixture is crumbly. (The faster the better, you don’t want the fats to melt.) Make a well in center and pour in buttermilk. Stir just until the dough comes together;  it will be sticky.

Turn dough onto a floured surface.  Dust top of dough with flour and gently fold dough over itself until a soft dough forms, about 5 or 6 times. Press into a 1-inch thick round. Using a 2-inch cutter, cut out biscuits by pushing straight down;  do not twist cutter. Place biscuits on baking sheet, sides just touching. Gently gather scraps, press out 1-inch-thick, and cut out biscuits.  (These scrap biscuits will not be quite as light as the first ones.)

Bake until biscuits are fluffy and golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes.  Brush tops with melted butter, if desired. Makes 12 biscuits.